VARIOUS PSYCHOLOGICAL TESTS

In this week’s assignment, you will create an annotated bibliography that contains a review of eight research articles that have utilized various psychological tests that you have learned about this term. To accomplish this task, you will need to find one peer reviewed journal article for each of the tests listed below:

Myers-Briggs
16-PF
NEO-PI-R
WIAT-III
MMPI-2
CPI
Campbell Interest and Skill Survey
Strong Interest Inventory
You will find research articles that are peer reviewed in scholarly journals. Scholarly journal articles are also often referred to as primary source documents.

As indicated above, a scholarly journal article can be found in the South University Online Library.

Note: Be mindful, however, not everything you find in the library will be a scholarly journal article and thus not everything in the library is appropriate for this assignment. For instance, a newspaper article will come up in a literature search but this is not a scholarly journal. Thus, you must be able to discern the difference between an appropriate and inappropriate resource. To find more information regarding utilizing the South University Online Library and accessing scholarly journal articles click on the Library Guide. Remember, what cannot be utilized for this assignment are any web pages, magazines, newspapers, textbooks, book chapters, and other books.

The annotated bibliography should include the following for each article:

Write a 2- to 3-paragraph summary for each article. Remember to use your own words, but give credit to the authors of the article.
Write 2- to 3-paragraphs that address how the test was used by the researcher.
Write a two paragraph analysis and evaluation for each article.
Make sure that you integrate what you learned (with in text citations) in your course readings in your analysis.
Support your responses with examples.

Using APA format, appropriately cite your sources throughout the assignment and include references on a separate page.

RECORD: 1
Title:

Evidence of validity for the Skill Scale scores of the Campbell Interest and Skill Survey

Authors:

Hansen, Jo-Ida C. ⁎
Leuty, Melanie E.

Affiliation:

Department of Psychology, University of Minnesota, N565 Elliott Hall, 75 East River Road, Minneapolis, MN 55455, USA

Source:

In Journal of Vocational Behavior 2007 71(1):23-44

Publisher:

Elsevier Inc.

Keywords:

Campbell Interest and Skill Survey
Validity
Career assessment

Abstract:

The purpose of the current study was to investigate the evidence of validity of the Skill Scale scores on the Campbell Interest and Skill Survey (CISS). In a sample of 221 college students, analyses between the CISS Skill Scale scores and the CISS Interest Scale, the Strong Interest Inventory, and selfreported MAEQ abilities scores were conducted. Results provided evidence of convergent and discriminate validity of the Skill Scale scores. Furthermore, Skill Scale scores were found to be predictive of declared college major above chance levels. Conclusions from the results support the use of the CISS Skill Scales in counseling settings. Further investigation of the content being measured by the Skill Scales and their use in career interventions is recommended.

Document Type:

Article

ISSN:

0001-8791

DOI:

10.1016/j.jvb.2007.04.006

Accession Number:

S0001879107000413

Copyright:

Copyright @ 2007 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

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Evidence” class=”redactor-linkify-object”>https://su.idm.oclc.org/login?url=https://search.e… of validity for the Skill Scale scores of the Campbell Interest and Skill Survey

RECORD: 1
Title:

USING the STRONG INTEREST INVENTORY to ASSIST COLLEGE STUDENTS with their CAREER DECISIONS.

Authors:

Garis, Jeff W. jgaris@fsu.edu
Li, Yaoshan Ivy1

Source:

Career Planning & Adult Development Journal. Winter2014, Vol. 30 Issue 4, p25-35. 11p.

Document Type:

Article

Subject Terms:

*VOCATIONAL guidance
VOCATIONAL guidance counselors
COUNSELOR & client
STRONG Vocational Interest Blank
INTEREST inventories

NAICS/Industry Codes:

624310 Vocational Rehabilitation Services

Abstract:

A triangulation of three general ingredients of individual career counseling include: (a) Process: the counseling relationship, the process of reflecting and considering the client’s internal information, and the decision-making process, (b) Information: external academic and career information, and (c) Assessment: internal client information regarding personality, interests, values and skills obtained via assessment measures. The SII represents a tool to gather client measured interests, has been regularly updated and continues to be one of the most scientifically sound, thoroughly researched and widely used interest inventories (Leierer, Strohmer, Blackwell, Thompson & Donnay, 2008). Since its creation in 1927, The Strong Interest Inventory (SII) has enjoyed widespread use as an assessment tool supporting college student career counseling (Don-nay, Morris, Schaubhut & Thompson, 2005). [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]

Copyright of Career Planning & Adult Development Journal is the property of Career Planning & Adult Development Network and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder’s express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full abstract. (Copyright applies to all Abstracts.)

Author Affiliations:

1Instructor in the department of Human Development and Family Studies, Pennsylvania State University

ISSN:

0736-1920

Accession Number:

109146059

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USING” class=”redactor-linkify-object”>https://su.idm.oclc.org/login?url=https://search.e… the STRONG INTEREST INVENTORY to ASSIST COLLEGE STUDENTS with their CAREER DECISIONS.

RECORD: 1 CPI
Title:

WAIS-IV GAI and CPI discrepancies in multiple sclerosis and traumatic brain injury.

Authors:

J Ryan J; a Psychological Science , University of Central Missouri , Warrensburg , Missouri , USA.
Kreiner DS; a Psychological Science , University of Central Missouri , Warrensburg , Missouri , USA.
Glass Umfleet L; b Medical College of Wisconsin , Milwaukee , Wisconsin , USA.
Gontkovsky ST; c Mercy Health , Youngstown , Ohio , USA.
Myers-Fabian A; d Austin Neuropsychology PLLC , Austin , Texas , USA.

Source:

Applied neuropsychology. Adult [Appl Neuropsychol Adult] 2018 Jan-Feb; Vol. 25 (1), pp. 51-56. Date of Electronic Publication: 2016 Oct 25.

Publication Type:

Journal Article

Language:

English

Journal Info:

Publisher: Taylor & Francis Group Country of Publication: United States NLM ID: 101584082 Publication Model: Print-Electronic Cited Medium: Internet ISSN: 2327-9109 (Electronic) Linking ISSN: 23279095 NLM ISO Abbreviation: Appl Neuropsychol Adult Subsets: MEDLINE

Imprint Name(s):

Original Publication: Philadelphia, PA : Taylor & Francis Group

MeSH Terms:

Brain Injuries, Traumatic/*psychology
Intelligence/*physiology
Multiple Sclerosis/*psychology
Adolescent ; Adult ; Female ; Humans ; Male ; Middle Aged ; Neuropsychological Tests ; Psychometrics ; Reproducibility of Results ; Wechsler Scales ; Young Adult

Abstract:

We examined relationships between the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Fourth Edition (WAIS-IV) General Ability Index (GAI) and Cognitive Proficiency Index (CPI) in two clinical samples. The mean pattern produced by 42 individuals with multiple sclerosis (MS) and 47 with traumatic brain injury (TBI) was the same, GAI > CPI. This pattern occurred in 61.9% and 78.7% of the protocols of patients with MS or TBI, respectively. The MS sample earned a significantly larger CPI mean than did patients with TBI. The group means did not differ on the GAI. Patients with TBI had significantly larger GAI-CPI discrepancy score means than those with MS. Receiver operating characteristics (ROC) analysis assessed the ability of GAI-CPI discrepancies to differentiate the samples. The area under curve (AUC) was 0.67, 95% [0.55, 0.78], which indicated low accuracy in terms of group classification.

Contributed Indexing:

Keywords: Cognitive Proficiency Index (CPI); Full Scale IQ (FSIQ); General Ability Index (GAI); Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Fourth Edition (WAIS-IV); multiple sclerosis; traumatic brain injury

Entry Date(s):

Date Created: 20161026 Date Completed: 20180727 Latest Revision: 20180727

Update Code:

20200827

DOI:

10.1080/23279095.2016.1241786

PMID:

27779426

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RECORD: 1 MMPI-2
Title:

Interpretive reliability of two common MMPI-2 profiles.

Authors:

Deskovitz, Mark A.. Department of Psychology, Central Michigan University, Mt. Pleasant, MI, US, desko1ma@cmich.edu
Weed, Nathan C.. Department of Psychology, Central Michigan University, Mt. Pleasant, MI, US, weed1nc@cmich.edu
Chakranarayan, Cheryl. Department of Psychology, Central Michigan University, Mt. Pleasant, MI, US, chakr1c@cmich.edu
Williams, John E.. Department of Psychology, Central Michigan University, Canmore, AB, Canada, john.eustis@gmail.com

Address:

Chakranarayan, Cheryl, Department of Psychology, Central Michigan University, Mt. Pleasant, MI, US, chakr1c@cmich.edu

Source:

Cogent Psychology, Vol 3(1), Dec, 2016. ArtID: 1161287

NLM Title Abbreviation:

Cogent Psychol

Publisher:

United Kingdom : Taylor & Francis

ISSN:

2331-1908 (Electronic)

Language:

English

Keywords:

MMPI-2, reliability, code types, q-sort

Abstract:

Users of multi-scale tests like the MMPI-2 tend not to interpret scales one at a time in a way that would correspond to standard scale-level reliability information. Instead, clinicians integrate inferences from a multitude of scales simultaneously, producing a descriptive narrative that is thought to characterize the examinee. This study was an attempt to measure the reliability of such integrated interpretations using a q-sort research methodology. Participants were 20 MMPI-2 users who responded to E-mail solicitations on professional listservs and in personal emails. Each participant interpreted one of two common MMPI-2 profiles using a q-set of 100 statements designed for MMPI-2 interpretation. To measure the ‘interpretive reliability’ of the MMPI-2 profile interpretations, q-sort descriptions were intercorrelated. Mean pairwise interpretive reliability was .39, lower than expected, and there was no significant difference in reliability between profiles. There was also not a significant difference between within-profile and cross-profile correlations. Q-set item analysis was conducted to determine which individual statements had the most impact on interpretive reliability. Although sampling in this study was limited, implications for the field reliability of MMPI-2 interpretation are sobering. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved)

Document Type:

Journal Article

Subjects:

*Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory; *Personality Measures; *Psychometrics; *Test Reliability; Clinicians

PsycINFO Classification:

Tests & Testing (2220)
Professional Personnel Attitudes & Characteristics (3430)

Population:

Human

Age Group:

Adulthood (18 yrs & older)

Tests & Measures:

Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2 [Appended] DOI: 10.1037/t15120-000

Methodology:

Empirical Study; Quantitative Study

Format Covered:

Electronic

Publication Type:

Journal; Peer Reviewed Journal

Publication History:

First Posted: Mar 9, 2016; Accepted: Mar 1, 2016; First Submitted: Oct 25, 2015

Release Date:

20170316

Copyright:

This open access article is distributed under a Creative Commons Attribution (CC-BY) 4.0 license.. The Author(s). 2016

Accession Number:

2017-04291-001

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Database:

APA PsycInfo

15 hours ago
RECORD: 1 WAIT-III
Title:

Incremental criterion validity of WAIS–IV factor index scores: Relationships with WIAT–II and WIAT–III subtest and composite scores.

Authors:

Canivez, Gary L.. Department of Psychology, Eastern Illinois University, Charleston, IL, US, glcanivez@eiu.edu

Address:

Canivez, Gary L., Department of Psychology, Eastern Illinois University, 600 Lincoln Ave, Charleston, IL, US, 61920-3099, glcanivez@eiu.edu

Source:

Psychological Assessment, Vol 25(2), Jun, 2013. pp. 484-495.

NLM Title Abbreviation:

Psychol Assess

Publisher:

US : American Psychological Association

Other Journal Titles:

Psychological Assessment: A Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology

ISSN:

1040-3590 (Print)
1939-134X (Electronic)

Language:

English

Keywords:

WAIS–IV, achievement prediction, construct validity, hierarchical multiple regression, incremental validity, Wechsler Individual Achievement Test, subtests, scores

Abstract:

The present study examined the incremental validity of Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale–4th Edition (WAIS–IV; Wechsler, 2008a) factor index scores in predicting academic achievement on the Wechsler Individual Achievement Test–2nd Edition (WIAT–II; Psychological Corporation, 2002a) and on the Wechsler Individual Achievement Test–3rd Edition (WIAT–III; Wechsler, 2009a) beyond that predicted by the WAIS–IV Full Scale IQ (FSIQ). As with previous intelligence test incremental validity studies, the WAIS–IV FSIQ accounted for statistically significant and generally large portions of WIAT–II and WIAT–III subtest and composite score variance. WAIS–IV factor index scores combined to provide statistically significant increments in variance accounted for in most WIAT–II and WIAT–III subtest and composite scores over and above the FSIQ score; however, the effect sizes ranged from trivial to medium as observed in investigations with other intelligence tests (i.e., Glutting, Watkins, Konold, & McDermott, 2006; Youngstrom, Kogos, & Glutting, 1999). Individually, the WAIS–IV factor index scores provided trivial to small unique contributions to predicting WIAT–II and WIAT–III scores. This finding indicated that the FSIQ should retain primacy and greatest interpretive weight in WAIS–IV interpretation, as previously indicated by WAIS–IV subtest variance partitions form hierarchical exploratory factor analyses (Canivez & Watkins, 2010a, 2012b). (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2020 APA, all rights reserved)

Document Type:

Journal Article

Subjects:

*Construct Validity; *Subtests; *Test Validity; *Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale; *Criterion Validity; Intelligence; Intelligence Quotient; Psychometrics; Test Scores; Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children; Incremental Validity

Medical Subject Headings (MeSH):

Achievement; Adolescent; Educational Measurement; Factor Analysis, Statistical; Female; Humans; Male; Predictive Value of Tests; Psychometrics; Reproducibility of Results; Wechsler Scales

PsycINFO Classification:

Developmental Scales & Schedules (2222)
Cognitive & Perceptual Development (2820)

Population:

Human
Male
Female

Location:

US

Age Group:

Adolescence (13-17 yrs)
Adulthood (18 yrs & older)
Young Adulthood (18-29 yrs)

Tests & Measures:

Wechsler Individual Achievement Test–3rd Edition
Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale–Fourth Edition DOI: 10.1037/t15169-000
Wechsler Individual Achievement Test–Second Edition DOI: 10.1037/t15173-000

Grant Sponsorship:

Sponsor: Eastern Illinois University, Council on Faculty Research
Other Details: 2011 Summer Research Grant
Recipients: No recipient indicated

Conference:

Annual convention of the National Association of School Psychologists, 2012

Conference Notes:

Preliminary results and versions were presented at the aforementioned conference and the 2012 annual convention of the American Psychological Association.

Methodology:

Empirical Study; Quantitative Study

Format Covered:

Electronic

Publication Type:

Journal; Peer Reviewed Journal

Publication History:

First Posted: May 6, 2013; Accepted: Dec 17, 2012; Revised: Dec 17, 2012; First Submitted: Mar 19, 2012

Release Date:

20130506

Correction Date:

20200713

Digital Object Identifier:

http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/a0032092

PMID:

23647042

PsycARTICLES Identifier:

pas-25-2-484

Accession Number:

2013-15692-001

Number of Citations in Source:

104

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15 hours ago
RECORD: 1 NEO-PI-R
Title:

Distinguishing between demoralization and specific personality traits in clinical assessment with the NEO-PI-R.

Authors:

Noordhof, Arjen. Department of Psychology, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, Netherlands, a.noordhof@uva.nl
Sellbom, Martin. Department of Psychology, Australian National University, Australia
Eigenhuis, Annemarie. Department of Psychology, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, Netherlands
Kamphuis, Jan H.. Department of Psychology, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, Netherlands

Address:

Noordhof, Arjen, Department of Psychology, University of Amsterdam, Weesperplein 4, 1018 XA, Amsterdam, Netherlands, a.noordhof@uva.nl

Source:

Psychological Assessment, Vol 27(2), Jun, 2015. pp. 645-656.

NLM Title Abbreviation:

Psychol Assess

Publisher:

US : American Psychological Association

Other Journal Titles:

Psychological Assessment: A Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology

ISSN:

1040-3590 (Print)
1939-134X (Electronic)

Language:

English

Keywords:

NEO-PI-R, Demoralization, assessment, MMPI-2-RF

Abstract:

Demoralization, a nonspecific unpleasant state that is common in clinical practice, has been identified as a potential source of nonspecificity in the assessment of personality and psychopathology. The aim of this research was to distinguish between Demoralization and specific personality traits in a widely used measure of personality: the Neuroticism–Extraversion–Openness Personality Inventory-Revised (NEO-PI-R). NEO-PI-R and Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2 questionnaires were completed by 278 patients of a specialized clinic for personality disorders in The Netherlands. Furthermore, a replication sample was used consisting of 405 patients from the same institution who completed NEO-PI-R questionnaires, as well. A measure of Demoralization was derived (NEOdem, a NEO-PI-R-based Demoralization scale) using factor analytic techniques. Results indicated that the Demoralization Scale scores were reliable and showed expected patterns of convergence and divergence with conceptually relevant Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2-RF scales. When items contributing to Demoralization-related variance were removed from the NEO-PI-R scales, increased specificity was notable with regard to external correlates. These results provide supportive evidence for the validity and heuristic potential of distinguishing between Demoralization and specific personality traits within the NEO-PI-R. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2020 APA, all rights reserved)

Document Type:

Journal Article

Subjects:

*Measurement; *Personality Disorders; *Personality Traits; *Test Reliability; *Test Validity; Demoralization

Medical Subject Headings (MeSH):

Adolescent; Adult; Diagnosis, Differential; Female; Humans; MMPI; Male; Middle Aged; Morale; Netherlands; Personality Assessment; Personality Disorders; Psychometrics; Psychopathology; Young Adult

PsycINFO Classification:

Clinical Psychological Testing (2224)
Personality Disorders (3217)

Population:

Human
Male
Female

Location:

Netherlands

Age Group:

Adulthood (18 yrs & older)
Young Adulthood (18-29 yrs)
Thirties (30-39 yrs)
Middle Age (40-64 yrs)

Tests & Measures:

NEO Personality Inventory-Revised–Dutch Version
Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2-RF–Dutch Version
Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis II Personality Disorders
Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis I Disorders

Methodology:

Empirical Study; Quantitative Study

Supplemental Data:

Appendixes Internet
Tables and Figures Internet

Format Covered:

Electronic

Publication Type:

Journal; Peer Reviewed Journal

Publication History:

First Posted: Jan 12, 2015; Accepted: Oct 30, 2014; Revised: Oct 29, 2014; First Submitted: Jan 17, 2014

Release Date:

20150112

Correction Date:

20200511

Copyright:

American Psychological Association. 2015

Digital Object Identifier:

http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/pas0000067; http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/pas0000067.supp(Supplemental)

PMID:

25580613

PsycARTICLES Identifier:

pas-27-2-645

Accession Number:

2015-00694-001

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RECORD: 1 16-PF
Title:

Predicting the Sixteen Personality Factors (16PF) of an individual by analyzing facial features.

Authors:

Gavrilescu, Mihai1mike.gavrilescu@gmail.com
Vizireanu, Nicolae1

Source:

EURASIP Journal on Image & Video Processing. 8/30/2017, Vol. 2017 Issue 1, p1-19. 19p.

Document Type:

Article

Subject Terms:

*Facial expression
*Personality
Neural circuitry
Back propagation
Vigilance (Psychology)

Abstract:

We propose a novel three-layered neural network-based architecture for predicting the Sixteen Personality Factors from facial features analyzed using Facial Action Coding System. The proposed architecture is built on three layers: a base layer where the facial features are extracted from each video frame using a multi-state face model and the intensity levels of 27 Action Units (AUs) are computed, an intermediary level where an AU activity map is built containing all AUs’ intensity levels fetched from the base layer in a frame-by-frame manner, and a top layer consisting of 16 feed-forward neural networks trained via backpropagation which analyze the patterns in the AU activity map and compute scores from 1 to 10, predicting each of the 16 personality traits. We show that the proposed architecture predicts with an accuracy of over 80%: warmth, emotional stability, liveliness, social boldness, sensitivity, vigilance, and tension. We also show there is a significant relationship between the emotions elicited to the analyzed subjects and high prediction accuracy obtained for each of the 16 personality traits as well as notable correlations between distinct sets of AUs present at high-intensity levels and increased personality trait prediction accuracy. The system converges to a stable result in no more than 1 min, making it faster and more practical than the Sixteen Personality Factors Questionnaire and suitable for real-time monitoring of people’s personality traits. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]

Copyright of EURASIP Journal on Image & Video Processing is the property of Springer Nature and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder’s express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full abstract. (Copyright applies to all Abstracts.)

Author Affiliations:

1Department of Telecommunications , University ‘Politehnica’ of Bucharest , 1-3 Iuliu Maniu Blvd 06107 Bucharest 6 Romania

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